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Week 1 Social Media Posts/100 Days to The Vote

 | Published on 7/31/2020

WEEK 1 of 100 Days to The Vote/Social Media Campaign


Mon, July 27  

Celebrating 72 hard years. It took suffragists 72 years to win the right for women to vote in the United States. The fight began in earnest in the middle 1800s and finally was won a century ago, in August 1920. Above: Suffrage leader Alice Paul celebrates. (Library of Congress)  #Votes4All, #19thAmendment, #suffragecentennial



Tues, July 28, Speaking Truth

Sojourner Truth (1797-1883) may have been the first African American suffragist. She spoke widely in support of women’s rights and the vote for women and Black men. The powerful “Ain’t I A Woman?” speech, given in 1851 at a women’s rights conference in Akron, Ohio, made her famous.  #Votes4All, #19thAmendment, #suffragecentennial



Wed, July 29, 1918 Pandemic’s Effects

A century ago, the suffragists’ battle for the vote was complicated by the 1918 flu pandemic and World War I. Many people were ill, and protesters couldn’t gather. But women’s stalwart service during the crises showed their value as full partners with men. In some ways, the 1918 crises helped create the success of women’s suffrage in 1920. (Florida State Archives)  #Votes4All, #19thAmendment, #suffragecentennial




Thurs, July 30, Voting in Florida: Three Ways

The Sunshine State offers three ways to vote: Vote-By-Mail, early voting, and voting on election day. For more information about these options, see www.ocfelections.com/how-to-vote   #Votes4All, #Vote411



Fri, July 31, Early Voters

Beginning on May 26, 1919 – more than a year before national women’s suffrage was ratified in August 1920 – women in Orlando and Winter Park won the right to vote in municipal affairs. Above, equal-suffrage advocates join an Orlando auto parade. (Orange County Regional History Center)   #Votes4All, #19thAmendment, #suffragecentennial



Sat, Aug 1, Vote Safely

During these challenging pandemic times, the League of Women Voters of Orange County wants you to vote safely. In Orange County, visit the Supervisor of Elections Office at www.ocfelections.com/vote-by-mail or call 407-836-8683 to request your Vote-By-Mail ballot. From left: League members Ann Patton, Martha Haynie, and Joan Erwin show off their suffragist spirit.  #Votes4All, #LWVOC



Sun, Aug 2, Florida Hero 

Mary McLeod Bethune withstood threats from the Ku Klux Klan marching through the campus of her Daytona Beach school for girls in 1920 and in 1922, when she brought more than 100 African Americans to the polls to vote just days later. (Florida State Archives)  #Votes4All, #19thAmendment



Mon, Aug 3, The First

Jeannette Rankin (right), the first woman to hold a federal office, won election to Congress as a Republican from Montana in 1916. She lobbied for the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and later for the League of Women Voters, to help pass the 19th Amendment. (Library of Congress)  #Votes4All, #19thAmendment